Il Mio Corpo review – Intimate view of Sicily's poverty

This powerful documentary shows private joy as well as coming-of-age trauma

Il Mio Corpo Oscar lying on a hill
Il Mio Corpo ‘draws poetic connections between lives that don’t appear to touch’. Photograph: Publicity image
Il Mio Corpo ‘draws poetic connections between lives that don’t appear to touch’. Photograph: Publicity image
Simran Hans

Last modified on Mon 14 Dec 2020 02.25 EST

Under the baking sun and his father’s beady eye, Sicilian pre-teen Oscar scavenges for scrap metal on a mountainside. Among the piles of rubbish, he chances upon a statue of the Virgin Mary. Closer to the sea, young Nigerian immigrant Stanley mops a church floor.

This intimate observational documentary explores poverty in Sicily from two different vantage points, drawing poetic connections between lives that don’t appear to touch. Both, for example, have absent mothers. A close-up of Stanley swimming and a tracking shot of Oscar doing a wheelie along a dirt road are just as resonant, uniting the boys in private snatches of joy as well as trauma.

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