Christmas wish for Conservatives to lead by example

Letters

The leadership should have small celebrations at home, writes Frances Davies. And Keith Flett sheds light on the last time MPs sat on Christmas Day

A figure of prime minister Boris Johnson wearing a Christmas jumper at Madame Tussauds, in London.
A figure of prime minister Boris Johnson wearing a Christmas jumper at Madame Tussauds, in London. Photograph: Yui Mok/PA
A figure of prime minister Boris Johnson wearing a Christmas jumper at Madame Tussauds, in London. Photograph: Yui Mok/PA

Last modified on Sun 13 Dec 2020 13.19 EST

As scientists and government advisers urge families to rethink their Christmas plans (Scientists warn against Christmas gatherings in UK despite relaxed rules, 11 December), is it too much to ask that Boris Johnson and his cabinet do something novel for Christmas, and actually lead by example? In this scenario, Johnson promises he will have a small celebration at home, no travelling/overnighting/large numbers. He orders his cabinet to do likewise, and threatens anyone who “does a Cummings” with instant dismissal. This is of course a fantasy – the final retreat for the despairing.
Frances Davies
Thirsk, North Yorkshire

• The supposed Cromwellian ban on Christmas (Oliver Cromwell did it but will Boris Johnson? Why MPs might sit on Christmas Day, 10 December) didn’t in fact work. Parliament did meet on Christmas Day 1656, but not many MPs were present. One complained that Christmas festivities had kept him awake the previous night, while the MP for Maldon, Colonel Joachim Matthews, introduced a “short bill” to underline that Christmas was indeed illegal. It was challenged on technical grounds, and in the end MPs decided there were more important things to discuss.
Keith Flett
Tottenham, London