Brexit bumps should come as no surprise

Letters

William Wallace says David Frost cannot have been unaware of the consequences of what he so carefully negotiated, while Prof Chris Hendry wonders how Michael Gove will deal with the latest turbulence

Chief negotiator, David Frost
Chief negotiator, David Frost, says the situation has been ‘more than bumpy’. Photograph: Getty
Chief negotiator, David Frost, says the situation has been ‘more than bumpy’. Photograph: Getty

Last modified on Sun 14 Feb 2021 12.19 EST

David Frost misled the Lords EU committee when he blamed the EU for the “niggling border issues”, like the interruption of trade in shellfish, that have followed the last-minute agreement that he negotiated (EU to seek more time to ratify Brexit trade deal amid tensions with UK, 9 February).

He represented a government that insisted that we were an independent third country, seeking a minimalist agreement on Canadian lines. That’s what the trade and cooperation agreement gave us. It’s dishonest to complain now that the EU did not offer us extra concessions not in its treaty with Canada. He is, after all, an expert in diplomacy; he cannot have been unaware of the consequences of what he so carefully negotiated.
William Wallace
Liberal Democrats, House of Lords

Michael Gove compares the ongoing disruptions from Brexit to the initial turbulence at takeoff, before the flight settles down and the passengers are treated to a gin and tonic. Lord Frost says the relationship with the EU has been “more than bumpy” in the last six weeks. How would Michael Gove accommodate “problematic” to his flight simile? Failure in one of the engines?
Emeritus Prof Chris Hendry
Nottingham